Voyen Koreis





INTRODUCTION


1. WHAT IS KABBALAH?

2. OTHER PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE

3. PYTHAGORAS

4. THE TAROT

5. ADAM KADMON

6. ACT OF CREATION

7. THE TREE OF LIFE

8. THE FOUR WORLDS

9. HOD & NETZAH

 10. LIFE IS EVERYWHERE

11. LIFE AND DEATH

12. REINCARNATION

13. PSYCHOLOGY

14. THE VITAL PRINCIPLE

15. SYNCHRONICITY

16. TZIM-TZUM

17. BODIES OF MAN

18. HUMAN MIND

19. LILITH

20. KNOWLEDGE

21. OF ANGELS AND MEN

22. CREATION IN  GENESIS 2

23. THE LETTER YOD

24. TWENTY-TWO LETTERS

25. THE NAME OF GOD

26. THE ZOHAR

27. ABRAHAM AND SARAH

28. THE HEBREW LANGUAGE

29. THE PATRIARCHS

30. MALKHUT - THE LAST SEPHIRA

31 THE MYSTICAL KABBALAH

32. BETH – THE FIRST LETTER










INTRODUCTION


1. WHAT IS KABBALAH?

2. OTHER PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE

3. PYTHAGORAS

4. THE TAROT

5. ADAM KADMON

6. ACT OF CREATION

7. THE TREE OF LIFE

8. THE FOUR WORLDS

9. HOD & NETZAH

 10. LIFE IS EVERYWHERE

11. LIFE AND DEATH

12. REINCARNATION

13. PSYCHOLOGY

14. THE VITAL PRINCIPLE

15. SYNCHRONICITY

16. TZIM-TZUM

17. BODIES OF MAN

18. HUMAN MIND

19. LILITH

20. KNOWLEDGE

21. OF ANGELS AND MEN

22. CREATION IN  GENESIS 2

23. THE LETTER YOD

24. TWENTY-TWO LETTERS

25. THE NAME OF GOD

26. THE ZOHAR

27. ABRAHAM AND SARAH

28. THE HEBREW LANGUAGE

29. THE PATRIARCHS

30. MALKHUT - THE LAST SEPHIRA

31 THE MYSTICAL KABBALAH

32. BETH – THE FIRST LETTER











INTRODUCTION


1. WHAT IS KABBALAH?

2. OTHER PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE

3. PYTHAGORAS

4. THE TAROT

5. ADAM KADMON

6. ACT OF CREATION

7. THE TREE OF LIFE

8. THE FOUR WORLDS

9. HOD & NETZAH

 10. LIFE IS EVERYWHERE

11. LIFE AND DEATH

12. REINCARNATION

13. PSYCHOLOGY

14. THE VITAL PRINCIPLE

15. SYNCHRONICITY

16. TZIM-TZUM

17. BODIES OF MAN

18. HUMAN MIND

19. LILITH

20. KNOWLEDGE

21. OF ANGELS AND MEN

22. CREATION IN  GENESIS 2

23. THE LETTER YOD

24. TWENTY-TWO LETTERS

25. THE NAME OF GOD

26. THE ZOHAR

27. ABRAHAM AND SARAH

28. THE HEBREW LANGUAGE

29. THE PATRIARCHS

30. MALKHUT - THE LAST SEPHIRA

31 THE MYSTICAL KABBALAH

32. BETH – THE FIRST LETTER








INTRODUCTION


1. WHAT IS KABBALAH?

2. OTHER PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE

3. PYTHAGORAS

4. THE TAROT

5. ADAM KADMON

6. ACT OF CREATION

7. THE TREE OF LIFE

8. THE FOUR WORLDS

9. HOD & NETZAH

 10. LIFE IS EVERYWHERE

11. LIFE AND DEATH

12. REINCARNATION

13. PSYCHOLOGY

14. THE VITAL PRINCIPLE

15. SYNCHRONICITY

16. TZIM-TZUM

17. BODIES OF MAN

18. HUMAN MIND

19. LILITH

20. KNOWLEDGE

21. OF ANGELS AND MEN

22. CREATION IN  GENESIS 2

23. THE LETTER YOD

24. TWENTY-TWO LETTERS

25. THE NAME OF GOD

26. THE ZOHAR

27. ABRAHAM AND SARAH

28. THE HEBREW LANGUAGE

29. THE PATRIARCHS

30. MALKHUT - THE LAST SEPHIRA

31 THE MYSTICAL KABBALAH

32. BETH – THE FIRST LETTER

Meetings With Remarkable People   Mephisto & Pheles    Intrusion   The Kabbalah  
 The Čapek Brothers    Struggle of the Magicians    
The Fools' Pilgrimage  Contact 

1.
WHAT IS THE KABBALAH?


 
The answer is that it can be a lot of different things to a lot of people, but essentially it is the science of being. The word itself means reception, but it can also mean acceptance, and when there is a reception or an acceptance there also has to be a communication, transmission; in other words an open passageway along which something is being passed on and received. In this case, passed on is the knowledge that one person has and wishes (or needs, perhaps even is compelled) to pass onto another person. What is being passed on is the ultimate; it is the philosophy of life, the science of life or, if you wish, religious philosophy. It deals above all with the Creator of the world and with the man’s place in the Universe.

For anyone writing a book on the subject, the above has to have serious implications, which need to be further explained. By its very nature, the Kabbalah is passed directly from person to person, on a one to one basis. This is the Kabbalah at its purest; in fact there is no other Kabbalah than Kabbalah based on the oral tradition. There are other qualifications. For instance, traditionally a teacher of the Kabbalah would not have accepted a student until he reached the age of forty or even forty-two, according to some. This was the minimal requirement; before reaching this age limit the person was not considered to have been able to gain enough experience in life to understand some of the more advanced concepts, spiritual and moral, that he would be facing. That sounds reasonable, until we realise that one of the most famous exponents of the Kabbalah, Isaac Luria (1534-1572), only lived to 38. Had his teachers followed this rule there would not be the Lurianic Kabbalah, one of the basic teachings, which has probably influenced more Kabbalists than any other. Consequently there would not be the Chasidic movement, which has drawn much from this source, and which had stood firmly on the side of those who had propagated the forming of the state of Israel. That would probably not be here either. The world would be looking quite different from what it is now…

Also, when I mentioned the students of Kabbalah, I used the pronoun “he”, as all the female and perhaps some male readers would have noticed. I had to say “he”, because originally only the male students had access to these teachings. Though the Kabbalah itself is quite flexible and open to social development, there still is a gender-based segregation within the Jewish religion from which many of its exponents come — one of the things that I do find objectionable, though there is little one could do about such attitudes. However, the more progressive proponents of the Kabbalah have lately been lifting at least some of these restrictions. One of the most prominent Kabbalists of the modern era and author of more than twenty books on the Kabbalah assured me that the age of thirty was now acceptable (I had just turned forty at the time), because people generally move through earlier stages of life at a faster pace. In any case, there were quite a few women to be seen at his lectures; I would even say that they might have prevailed. And this was before the Internet age really kicked in. It appears that things must be changing on that front as well.

The traditional ways of passing on and receiving the Kabbalistic teachings would no doubt be preferable to many, and because of this it would not be right claiming that I could teach you all about the Kabbalah, or even much of it, just by putting some words onto these pages. After having spent about three decades learning the basics of Hebrew, studying the Kabbalah and related subjects, reading books, attending regular lectures, etc, still the best I can hope for is showing you how I look at the subject, and perhaps bring in some inspiration. Also, on my background of visual as well as performing arts, I intend in some places to juxtapose these teachings to other things I have learnt in life. Whatever will come out of it, I have to ask you to read with the understanding that what you have in front of you is not the pure Kabbalah, because it could never claim to be that. It could only be something that I would call of the excrescences of Kabbalah, which I had the fortune to collect over the years.


DO I NEED TO BE JEWISH?

If you are a Westerner, you already are, in a certain sense, particularly if you are a Christian. Who were the founders of Christianity? Jesus (Yehoshua), on whose mission the whole faith is based and Paul (Saul), who became its most ardent propagator, were both Jews. As were the twelve disciples of Jesus together with most people around, with the exception of a few Romans, who only appear in the picture near the end of the story told us by the four gospels. The Jewish nation was the first to pull itself out of the culture of polytheism and pantheism. When the path ahead was clear for the new ways of thinking the rest of the Western world was to follow. The faith however is different to esoteric thought. The latter is always to be found on a different level — depending on how we look at it, it either lies at its basis or it kind of arches over it. Every religious creed has its esoteric core: with the Jews it is the Kabbalah, Hermetism with the Christians, Sufism with the Islamists, etc. When we compare them we find that they are close to each other, differing in the main only in terminology and some details, chiefly as a result of their civilisational and mythological roots. This is why a true esoteric thought or true Kabbalah knows no boundaries, religious or ethnic. If an orthodox Jew, for instance, would tell you that unless you belong to his race and faith you cannot be a true Kabbalist, you can be certain of one thing: he definitely is not a Kabbalist either.

This leads us to another question that is often asked: Is it essential to know Hebrew to be able to study the Kabbalah? Some of the Jewish Kabbalists I had met insisted that it is impossible to study the Kabbalah without a good knowledge of Hebrew. But they would say that, wouldn’t they? On the other hand, I had met other people who like myself were definitely not Jewish, and who would not stand a chance if they had to explain to a cab driver in Tel Aviv which hotel they want to go to, but who were still able to make a good progress while studying the Kabbalah. After all, there are scholars who can read and translate for you the Egyptian hieroglyphs, who have never set up the foot in Egypt. Others have been to Egypt, but they still don’t know how certain words were exactly pronounced three or four millennia ago, because nobody knows that these days and probably never will. In the past centuries there have been large numbers of Hermetic Kabbalists (some might even have called themselves Christian Kabbalists) who have learned some Hebrew, enough for their purpose, but who certainly would not have been able to converse fluently with members of the Jewish community, for instance. Many of them were based in Prague, particularly around the turn of the 17th century, the city where I also grew up. After a careful consideration, I have come to the conclusion that the basic knowledge of Hebrew would suffice in most cases. Absolutely essential is being able to recognise all the individual Hebrew letters, knowing their pronunciation and their numerical values, and learning some of the key words and phrases, particularly those found in the books of Genesis and Exodus, because these are the words that have special power and they cannot be substituted by words in any other language without losing most or even all of it. But it certainly isn’t necessary being able to converse in Hebrew, though naturally this could be useful.

 

WHENCE CAME THE KABBALAH?


The Kabbalists would tell you, that the Kabbalah was here before any religion or theological system and that it was given to Adam by the Creator. When the Kabbalah mentions Adam it means all of mankind, Adam Kadmon being its symbol. This also applies to other terms and conceptions. It is necessary to always bear on mind that this is how the Kabbalah works, and that it might even touch on the absurd. The same applies to Bible. I would even say that the more absurd some statement would appear, the deeper the meaning that is hidden behind it. It is up to us to discover such concealed meaning, which could usually be achieved through meditation. Quite often we would run into passages which deal with concepts that are strange to us, that are beyond the life experiences a person has gathered, and therefore cannot quite grasp the deep meaning that might be hiding behind it. Because of this, it is sometimes better to leave it without explanation, in other words pass it on in the same form one has received it. Someone with more experience or more flexible mind might be able to understand the metaphysical truth that has defied us.

Back to Adam (the mankind) and the Kabbalah. That was given to us without any conditions. The reason for having been given these precepts is that humanity has to have the chance to learn and understand the laws of the spirit, which rule in the Universe and which constantly influence our daily lives. These laws do exist, regardless of whether we are aware of them and whether or not we are willing to acknowledge them. In the course of our daily lives we too are all subjects of certain laws that the society has founded, developed and refined them over many centuries. If we break these laws we can expect to be punished in some way, or at lest be reprimanded. Ignorance of the laws is no excuse because, at least in the democratic society, they are freely available and could be read by anyone.

The cosmic laws are no different, at least in the sense that they are here, whether we like it or not, whether we are prepared to adhere to them or whether we want to defy them. Some of these laws simply cannot be defied without consequences, often severe. Such are the laws of gravity, for instance. We all know that they are here, but none of us, including the most learned of scientists, know what they are. We know how they work, but what makes them work we do not have any idea about. The same goes for electricity. We can use both these forces to our advantage, we can build water or wind mills, electric turbines, etc. Still, why are things attracted to each other in the way they are, or what constitutes a magnetic field, we can only speculate about. Isaac Newton, the scientist who according to a legend was hit on the head by a falling apple, which helped to turn his attention in this direction, could work out the basics of these laws, and knew how they worked. But only Newton the Kabbalist and the Alchemist, with whom we will concern ourselves a little later, could perhaps intuitively understand some of the underlying causes. Nevertheless, he could not speak of such things in the scientific circles.

If we make an effort to learn at least some of these laws, and try to live in harmony with them, setting ourselves worthy goals within this spiritual and physical reality, it would greatly benefit us not only as individuals, but it would also contribute to the betterment of all of mankind and indeed of the whole world. By learning the basics of the Kabbalah, we gain the means of achieving contentment and happiness right at the core of our being. There are some pitfalls, which a student of the Kabbalah has to traverse. There are some instincts that the Western society has put into our minds, particularly over the recent centuries, and these have to be overcome. In some countries where the so called “dialectic materialism”, which is just another name for Marxism, is the state endorsed ideology (one might just as well say religion), this is even harder. The horizons are narrowed even more.


Dion Fortune (1890-1946, right), author of one of the best books on the subject, The Mystical Qabalah, writes about it:

The student of the Qabalah goes to work in exactly the opposite way to the student of natural science; the latter builds up synthetic concepts; the former analyses abstract concepts. It goes without saying, however, that before a concept can be analysed it must first be assembled. Someone must have thought out the principles that are resumed in the symbol, which is the object of meditation of the Qabalah. Who then were the first Kabbalists who built up the whole scheme? The Rabbis are unanimous upon this point; they were angels. In other words, it was beings of another order of creation than humanity who gave the Chosen People their Kabbalah.

To the modern mind this may seem as absurd a statement as the doctrine that babies are found under gooseberry bushes; but if we study the many mystical systems of comparative religion we find that all the illuminati are in agreement upon this point. All men and women who have had practical experience of the spiritual life tell us that they are taught by Divine beings. We shall be very foolish if we altogether disregard such a cloud of witnesses, especially those of us who never have had any personal experience of the higher states of consciousness. There are some psychologists who will tell us that the Angels of the Kabbalists and the Gods and Manus of other systems are our own repressed complexes; there are others with less limited outlook who will tell us that these Divine beings are the latent capacities of our own higher selves. To the devotional mystic this is not a point of any great moment; he gets his results, and that is all he cares about; but the philosophical mystic, in other words the occultist, thinks the matter out and arrives at certain conclusions. These conclusions, however, can only be understood when we know what we mean by reality and have a clear line of demarcation between the subjective and the objective. Any one who is trained in philosophical method knows that this is asking a good deal.


The very nature of the Kabbalah does not allow us to trace its whole history or the degree of its distension at the various historical epochs. However, according to the Kabbalists it was passed on from Adam through his sons and the following generations of patriarchs to Abraham. The most prominent of the early initiates were supposed to be Tubalcain (hints of which appear in the Old Testament), and of course, Noah. Eventually it reached Moses. Knowledge of the Kabbalah, in possession of Moses and his brother Aaron, but curiously also by some relative outsiders and rather enigmatic figures, such as Melchizedek or Moses’ father in law Jethro, was undeniably the underlying current behind the achievements of the Jewish nation after they had reached the Promised Land. A few centuries later, the same knowledge, this time through king Solomon, Hiram of Tyre, and their architect Hiram Abif, went into the building of the temple in Jerusalem. The legend, on which the rituals of the Freemasons have been built, has its roots here.

William Wynn Westcott (1848-1925)One of the great students of the Kabbalah, which incidentally he spelled Qabalah in the tradition of Hermetic societies, was William Wynn Westcott (1848-1925 - right).
Westcott was a medical doctor and for a number of years he acted as the London coroner. However, he had led another existence, that of a prominent occultist. Together with William Robert Woodman and Samuel Liddell McGregor Mathers he had founded the famous Hermetic Order of Golden Dawn, probably the best known occult society of the modern era. In the Introduction to his book The Study of the Qabalah W. W. Westcott wrote:

It must be confessed that the origin of Kabbalah is lost in the mists of antiquity; no one can demonstrate who was its author, or who were its earliest teachers. Considerable evidence may be adduced to show that its roots pass back to the Hebrew Rabbis who flourished at the time of the Second Temple about the year 515 B.C. Of its existence before that time I know of no proofs. It has been suggested that the captivity of the Jews in Babylon led to the formation of this philosophy by the effect of Chaldean lore and dogma acting on Jewish tradition. No doubt in the earliest stages of its existence the teaching was entirely oral, hence the name QBLH from QBL to receive, and it became varied by the minds through which it filtered in its course; there is no proof that any part of it was written for centuries after.

With the dispersion of the Jewish tribes, for many centuries the Kabbalah and the “bearers of its keys” went underground. Only at times it reappeared in the teachings of some great Kabbalists, such as Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai in Palestine of the 1st century AD, Moses de Leon in the 13th century Spain, the already mentioned 16th century Kabbalist, Rabbi Isaac Ben Solomon Luria (1534-1572), also known as the “Ari Zaal,” or “Divine Rabbi Isaac”. In the times of its obscurity the knowledge that was passed orally from one generation of initiates to the next had never disappeared; it was only kept carefully hidden by those who possessed it, as was the case at many points in history, from the ancient times right to the relatively recent past. The times were simply not right for this wisdom to bubble up to the surface and be made available to humanity, the condition of which Kabbalists have always known would eventually be removed, in time when mankind at last would be prepared to receive the Kabbalah and be able to benefit from this knowledge.


W. Wynn Westcott also quotes Dr. Christian Ginsburg from his  “Essay on the Qabalah” (incidentally, in this quotation you will find quite a collection of well-known historical personalities):

        A system of religious philosophy, or, more properly, of theosophy, which has not only exercised for hundreds of years an extraordinary influence on the mental development of so shrewd a people as the Jews, but has captivated the minds of some of the greatest thinkers of Christendom in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, claims the greatest attention of both the philosopher and the theologian. When it is added that among its captives were Raymond Lully, the celebrated scholastic metaphysician and chemist (died 1315); John Reuchlin, the renowned scholar and reviver of Oriental literature in Europe (born 1455, died 1522); John Picus de Mirandola, the famous philosopher and classical scholar (1463-1494); Cornelius Henry Agrippa, the distinguished philosopher, divine, and physician (1486-1535); John Baptist von Helmont, a remarkable chemist and physician (1577-1644); as well as our own countrymen, Robert Fludd, the famous physician and philosopher (1574-1637); and Dr. Henry More (1614-1687); and that these men, after restlessly searching for a scientific system which should disclose to them ‘the deepest depths’ of the divine nature, and show them the real tie which binds all things together, found the cravings of their minds satisfied by this theosophy, the claims of the Qabalah on the attention of students in literature and philosophy will readily be admitted. The claims of the Qabalah, however, are not restricted to the literary man and the philosopher; the poet too will find in it ample materials for the exercise of his lofty genius. How can it be otherwise with a theosophy which, we are assured, was born of God in Paradise, was nursed and reared by the choicest of the angelic hosts in heaven, and only held converse with the holiest of man’s children upon earth. Listen to the story of its birth, growth, and maturity, as told by its followers.

The Qabalah was first taught by God himself to a select company of angels, who formed a theosophical school in Paradise. After the Fall the angels most graciously communicated this heavenly doctrine to the disobedient children of earth, to furnish the protoplasts with the means of returning to their pristine nobility and felicity. From Adam it passed over to Noah, and then to Abraham, the friend of God, who emigrated with it to Egypt, where the patriarch allowed a portion of this mysterious doctrine to ooze out. It was in this way that the Egyptians obtained some knowledge of it, and the other Eastern nations could introduce it into their philosophical systems. Moses, who was learned in all the wisdom of Egypt, was first initiated into the Qabalah in the land of his birth, but became most proficient in it during his wanderings in the wilderness, when he not only devoted to it the leisure hours of the whole forty years, but received lessons in it from one of the angels. By the aid of this mysterious science the law-giver was enabled to solve the difficulties which arose during his management of the Israelites, in spite of the pilgrimages, wars, and frequent miseries of the nation. He covertly laid down the principles of this secret doctrine in the first four books of the Pentateuch, but withheld them from Deuteronomy. Moses also initiated the seventy elders into the secrets of this doctrine, and they again transmitted them from hand to hand. Of all who formed the unbroken line of tradition, David and Solomon were the most deeply initiated into the Qabalah. No one, however, dared to write it down, till Schimeon Ben Jochai, who lived at the time of the destruction of the second temple. After his death, his son, Rabbi Eleazar, and his secretary, Rabbi Abba, as well as his disciples, collated Rabbi Simon Ben Jochai’s treatises, and out of these composed the celebrated work called ZHR, Zohar, Splendour, which is the grand storehouse of Qabalism.

Kabbalism throughout the centuries has been open to many outside influences, and this is why I believe that no group of people, ethnic or religious, could ever claim it as its exclusive property. Just as the Bible does, it belongs to anybody who cares to take it up, who is deserving, and willing to do the work. It cannot be denied, of course, where the source lies: in the Pentateuch, the first five books of the Old Testament. Another name for the Pentateuch is the Five Books of Moses, and where did Moses come from? He was Jewish, naturally, though this cannot be proofed with absolute certainty, as we have no sources concerning his person other than the Old Testament. However, people in the ancient times probably knew more about basic genealogy than we do, despite our superior computer technology. On the other hand, the genetic research has given us some advantages; in many cases it might confirm or disprove things that were previously taken for granted. There are many amateur genealogists around in our times. Those who were into this subject in the ancient times were fewer in numbers, nevertheless they could be  classified as professionals. In each generation there would be individuals who have devoted their entire lives to becoming the walking chronicles of their tribes. This, no doubt, was true even of the Jewish people in the land of  Mitzraim (or Mizraim), which is the Hebrew name for Egypt. There will be more said about Moses later in this book, but at this point I would like to stress that he, and his brother Aaron, had lived several decades early in their lives at the court of the Egyptian Pharaoh, where the assembly of initiated priests of the Egyptian religion would also have been present. They, and their forebear Joseph, undoubtedly would have interacted with this elite group and learned a great deal from them. This was not the first time the Jews and the Egyptians were in contact. Tere almost certainly would have been more interaction between these two nations even before Joseph was sold by his brothers to Egypt as a slave. In Genesis 10:6 it is stated:

And sons of Ham are Cush, and Mitzraim, and Phut, and Canaan.

We can only speculate what this might mean, but it seems reasonable to assume that Ham’s son (and Noah’s grandson) at least at some stage had gone to live in Egypt. Looking at the patriarchs, Abraham and Jacob also went to Egypt, according to the Bible. Abraham’s journey took him all the way from Ur to Memphis — quite a trek in those days, but he and Sarah were escaping famine. As for that matter was Jacob with his other sons some years later.

There are more hints at strong outside influences, one of them being closely tied with the story of building the temple of Solomon. The idea of having a permanent temple built (instead of the peripatetic Tabernacle) was conceived by King David, but the task of organising the building of the actual temple fell onto his son Solomon, reputably the wisest man of the ancient times. The first thing Solomon apparently did was appointing two men as his close associates, both of whom came from the same city of Tyre, now in the southern part of Lebanon. They were Hiram Abif, who was to become the main architect of the temple, together with another Hiram, who was the reigning king of Tyre. In 1 Kings 7:13–14, Hiram (Abif) is described as the son of a widow from the tribe of Naphtali who was the son of a Tyrian bronze worker. According to the Bible, Solomon gave Hiram the task of casting the bronze ornate decorations for the temple, namely the two pillars that stood at the entrance. This, and the subsequent fate of the temple’s architect, who according to the legend was murdered by three of his workers after he refused to give them the password of the Master Mason, became an important part of the ritual in the lodges of Freemasons.

   

Masonic apron of the type allegedly worn in the lodge by George Washington (left)  The apron worn by members of the Ancient and Primitive Rite of Memphis Misraim (right)

Tyre was an ancient city, which according to Herodotus was founded as early as 2750 BC. It became one of the most important ports of the Phoenicians, to the historians still rather mysterious civilization of ancient mariners and merchants, who at the time had established their cities and colonies on the shores of the Mediterranean and the Black seas, which meant practically throughout the known world. It is hard to imagine a more open minded, more cosmopolitan, today we would say multicultural approach on part of the wise king Solomon, which made him join forces precisely with these two people. This is the act of reputedly the wisest king, a true initiate who obviously is no chauvinist, who knows that the Kabbalah belongs to the whole of mankind, not only to one small nation, whether or not it can rightly call itself the chosen one.



Meetings With Remarkable People   Mephisto & Pheles    Intrusion   The Kabbalah  
 The Čapek Brothers    Struggle of the Magicians    
The Fools' Pilgrimage  Contact 


İVoyen Koreis 2017  All rights reserved