Voyen Koreis





INTRODUCTION


1. WHAT IS KABBALAH?

2. OTHER PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE

3. PYTHAGORAS

4. THE TAROT

5. ADAM KADMON

6. ACT OF CREATION

7. THE TREE OF LIFE

8. THE FOUR WORLDS

9. HOD & NETZAH

 10. LIFE IS EVERYWHERE

11. LIFE AND DEATH

12. REINCARNATION

13. PSYCHOLOGY

14. THE VITAL PRINCIPLE

15. SYNCHRONICITY

16. TZIM-TZUM

17. BODIES OF MAN

18. HUMAN MIND

19. LILITH

20. KNOWLEDGE

21. OF ANGELS AND MEN

22. CREATION IN  GENESIS 2

23. THE LETTER YOD

24. TWENTY-TWO LETTERS

25. THE NAME OF GOD

26. THE ZOHAR

27. ABRAHAM AND SARAH

28. THE HEBREW LANGUAGE

29. THE PATRIARCHS

30. MALKHUT - THE LAST SEPHIRA

31 THE MYSTICAL KABBALAH

32. BETH – THE FIRST LETTER










INTRODUCTION


1. WHAT IS KABBALAH?

2. OTHER PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE

3. PYTHAGORAS

4. THE TAROT

5. ADAM KADMON

6. ACT OF CREATION

7. THE TREE OF LIFE

8. THE FOUR WORLDS

9. HOD & NETZAH

 10. LIFE IS EVERYWHERE

11. LIFE AND DEATH

12. REINCARNATION

13. PSYCHOLOGY

14. THE VITAL PRINCIPLE

15. SYNCHRONICITY

16. TZIM-TZUM

17. BODIES OF MAN

18. HUMAN MIND

19. LILITH

20. KNOWLEDGE

21. OF ANGELS AND MEN

22. CREATION IN  GENESIS 2

23. THE LETTER YOD

24. TWENTY-TWO LETTERS

25. THE NAME OF GOD

26. THE ZOHAR

27. ABRAHAM AND SARAH

28. THE HEBREW LANGUAGE

29. THE PATRIARCHS

30. MALKHUT - THE LAST SEPHIRA

31 THE MYSTICAL KABBALAH

32. BETH – THE FIRST LETTER











INTRODUCTION


1. WHAT IS KABBALAH?

2. OTHER PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE

3. PYTHAGORAS

4. THE TAROT

5. ADAM KADMON

6. ACT OF CREATION

7. THE TREE OF LIFE

8. THE FOUR WORLDS

9. HOD & NETZAH

 10. LIFE IS EVERYWHERE

11. LIFE AND DEATH

12. REINCARNATION

13. PSYCHOLOGY

14. THE VITAL PRINCIPLE

15. SYNCHRONICITY

16. TZIM-TZUM

17. BODIES OF MAN

18. HUMAN MIND

19. LILITH

20. KNOWLEDGE

21. OF ANGELS AND MEN

22. CREATION IN  GENESIS 2

23. THE LETTER YOD

24. TWENTY-TWO LETTERS

25. THE NAME OF GOD

26. THE ZOHAR

27. ABRAHAM AND SARAH

28. THE HEBREW LANGUAGE

29. THE PATRIARCHS

30. MALKHUT - THE LAST SEPHIRA

31 THE MYSTICAL KABBALAH

32. BETH – THE FIRST LETTER





Meetings With Remarkable People   Mephisto & Pheles    Intrusion   The Kabbalah  
 The Čapek Brothers    Struggle of the Magicians    
The Fools' Pilgrimage  Contact 





4. THE TAROT

It was sometime towards the end of the seventies when I met Eliot. I could pinpoint the exact day when our first conversation took place relatively easily, by looking it up in any old calendar. This should not be too difficult, for I have never forgotten that it happened on Friday the thirteenth. Which only added to the curiousness of this encounter.

It was early evening when I dialled up the telephone number that I copied earlier on the day from a rather unobtrusive card displayed on the small advertising board of a certain bookshop in down town Brisbane. A voice at the other end said:

 

- Eliot Mendel speaking.

I too had introduced myself and went on:

- I saw your note about the seminar you’re having on Sunday, about the Greek mythology. Who is the lecturer?

- I’m going to lecture. Some members of our society will also be speaking.

- Which society is that, if you don’t mind me asking?

- Could you please give me your phone number? I'm doing something now, but I would ring you back shortly.

I gave Eliot my number. Before he went off, he asked me:

- Would you like to see me, in about a minute or so?

- How could that be possible?

- Simply by turning on the Tenth Channel on the TV, if you have one on hand. I would like to see it myself. I’m going to ring you back as soon as it is over.

 

I turned on the TV. An early evening current affairs program was in progress. After the ubiquitous advertising session the moderator announced that next there would be a talk about Friday the Thirteenth and the superstitions that accompany it. He then brought in his guest, Eliot Mendel, whom he introduced as mythologist. The screen was almost filled by the moon-like face, which instantly I found very likeable and trustworthy. The questions the interviewer asked were naturally so chosen as to go down well with the average television viewer, and Eliot Mendel obviously was doing his best to oblige. For that reason I did not learn much I would not have already known. At the same time I had the feeling that it was easy for Eliot to talk about such matters, and that much more profound knowledge together with very unique brand of philosophy would be hiding under, in the quintessence of his personality, masked by the sparkling joviality which he allowed to bubble over. As he promised, Eliot phoned me back as soon as the program was over, and we talked for at least half an hour, even though I had already made up my mind about definitely going to his lecture.

 

 Various renditions of the tarot card number12, The Hanged Man

Almost thirty years have passed since this encounter. For about twenty of them, the society Eliot and I both belong to had been meeting on a weekly basis. People came and people went, some moved abroad, some had even left this world, but the core of the group had remained. What was the content of these meetings? Mythology, hermetic and esoteric subjects, Alchemy, Kabbalah, Theosophy, etc. This meant that the Tarot cards inevitably had to appear on the menu. We had devoted two full years to studying the symbolism of the Tarot in some detail. We had returned to the Tarot many times, and at a later stage I was also taking turns with Eliot in a cycle of public lectures on this subject. Interestingly, some thirty years after watching that interview with Eliot, I was myself invited to a similar interview by the Australian ABC, also on Friday the thirteenth. The theme was the same: Friday, number thirteen and superstition. It only proves that everything in this world is of a cyclic character.

I have already described my first encounter with the Tarot. Soon after I left the stricken country, the latest wave of interest in the Tarot had begun in the Western world. There were several such waves, the most significant one at about the middle of 19th century in France, when Eliphas Levi a Gérard Encausse (known as Papus), amongst others, have begun to publish articles and books on the subject of Tarot. When Tarot is mentioned, most people would have the mental image in front of their inner eye of a fortuneteller, revealing the future to a bored housewife or a wide-eyed young girl, or something similar. Nevertheless, there are people who are serious students of this subject, who avoid the fortune telling aspect altogether, and who are mainly interested in the archetypes and symbols that the individual arcana (plural of arcane or mystery in Latin) represent.

 

THE ORIGIN OF TAROT CARDS

 

The cards had come to Europe sometime in the second half of the 14th century. Before that time they are not mentioned on any documents and papers issued by the magistrates of medieval towns, ever eager to eradicate any possible threats to the good reputation of their town, which gambling on a large scale would certainly tarnish. The writers of the period, such as Francesco Petrarca, Giovanni Boccaccio or their English contemporary Geoffrey Chaucer, who have explored in their works practically all the filth and depravity that could be found in their time in the towns’ darkest recesses, never mention the playing cards. If they knew of them, they would have almost certainly written about them.

All these three were still alive, however, when in 1367 the canton of Bern officially prohibited gambling with playing cards. This is clearly proclaimed in the paper that is now held at the Austrian National Library in Vienna. Many European towns would soon follow. The survival of this picture book of esoteric wisdom, in the hands of gamblers and fortune telling Gypsies, was thus assured.

 

          

The Priestess, The Magician, The Strength and The Death in various designes.

We know now when the cards appeared in Europe, but where did they come from? There are many theories. According a fairly common one, the Romanies, known also as Gypsies as well as under a variety of other names throughout Europe, have brought them when they arrived to this continent, about the same time the Tarot appeared on the scene. Where they came from is not certain, possibly from India. Vishnu, the preserver of the world, is usually pictured as fourhanded god, holding four objects in his hands. The four colours that we find in the cards could have their origin here. The Gnostics, namely the Cathars, or some of their spiritual descendants, could have hidden their ideas in symbolic form here. The French esotericist Antoine Court de Gebelin at the end of 18th century, as well as several others after him, thought that hidden in the Tarot symbolism is the secret doctrine of the Egyptians. According to him, the book was saved from the burning remains of Egyptian temples and its author is none other than Thoth, known to the Greeks as Hermes Trismagistos. Thoth was the legendary creator of sacred numerology and writing; to the Egyptians he was the god of wisdom, occult art and science. In 1781 Court de Gebelin wrote the following:

Imagine the surprise that the discovery of an Egyptian book would cause if we heard it said that a work of the ancient Egyptians still existed in our time -- one of the books saved from the flames which consumed their superb libraries -- and which contained their purest beliefs regarding interesting things. Everyone would, no doubt, be eager to know such a precious and extraordinary book. If we added that this book is in very general use in a large part of Europe and that it has been in the hands of everyone for a number of centuries, it certainly would be surprising were it to be believed. Wouldn't it be the greatest surprise, if we vouched that we have never suspected that the book was Egyptian, and that we own it without really owning it because we have never tried to decipher one page of it, or to look upon the fruit of its exquisite wisdom as anything more than the accumulation of foolish figures meaning nothing in themselves? Wouldn't it be thought that we are trying to insult the intelligence of this audience?

This Egyptian book does exist. This Egyptian book is all that remains in our time of their superb libraries. It is even so common that not one scholar has condescended to bother with it since no one before us has ever suspected its illustrious origin, . . . In a word this book is the game of Tarot, a game, unknown in Paris, it is true, but very well known in Italy, Germany, and even in Province. This game is bizarre because of the kinds of figures appearing on its cards as well as their great number....

 

        I don’t propose to go through numerous other theories, some quite bizarre, about the origin of the Tarot. The Kabbalah and 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet, the same as the Tarot trumps, is by far the most obvious one. Even the word Tarot itself is reminiscent of the word Torah, which means the Hebrew sacred law, the first five books of the Bible. The word TAROT is very flexible, and can be read and interpreted in several different ways. Here is an example:

 

ROTA, TARO, ORAT, TORA, ATOR.

 

These words are formed by the transposition of the word TAROT. The first word, ROTA, means rotation, in this case of the wheel that we see on the above illustration. TARO, or TAROT, where the final T, if present, would only suggest the commencement of a new turn of the wheel, is the name under which this ancient system of preserving knowledge that uses pictorial symbolism is presently known. ORAT is the root of the Latin word that signifies speech, oration. TORA or TORAH, as we know, means the sacred law. ATOR, or HATHOR, was the old Egyptian goddess of Nature. If we put it all together, with a little imagination we get the following sentence:

 

THE WHEEL OF TAROT PROCLAIMS THE SACRED LAWS OF NATURE!

 

We would be referring to the Tarot and its symbolism intermittently throughout this book. However, to conclude this chapter, there is yet another theory, which was put forth (one feels rather a tongue in cheek) by my favourite author on the theme of Tarot, Paul Foster Case.

 

According to an occult tradition, in which I am inclined to place confidence, the actual date of its invention was about the year 1200 n.n. The inventors, this tradition avers, were a group of adepts who met at stated intervals in the city of Fez, in Morocco. After the destruction of Alexandria, Fez became the literary and scientific capital of the world. Thither, from all parts of the globe, came wise men of all nations, speaking all tongues. Their conferences were made difficult by differences in language and philosophical terminology. So they hit upon the device of embodying the most important of their doctrines in a book of pictures, whose combinations should depend on the occult harmonies of numbers.

Perhaps it was a Chinese adept who suggested the idea, for the Chinese have a proverb, "One picture is worth ten thousand words," and Chinese writing is made up of conventionalised pictures. These pictures express ideas instead of words, so that Chinese, Japanese and Koreans, although they speak more than seven different languages, communicate easily with one another, if only they can read and write.

As a skeleton for their invention the wise men chose the relatively simple system of numbers and letters afforded by the Qabalah, or Secret Wisdom of Israel. This esoteric doctrine, apparently Jewish, was really a development of ideas fundamentally identical with the wisdom taught in the secret schools of China, Tibet and India. Some account of it, therefore, must precede our study of the Tarot itself.

 

TO: ADAM KADMON


Meetings With Remarkable People   Mephisto & Pheles    Intrusion   The Kabbalah  
 The Čapek Brothers    Struggle of the Magicians    
The Fools' Pilgrimage  Contact 



©Voyen Koreis 2017  All rights reserved