Voyen Koreis





INTRODUCTION


1. WHAT IS KABBALAH?

2. OTHER PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE

3. PYTHAGORAS

4. THE TAROT

5. ADAM KADMON

6. ACT OF CREATION

7. THE TREE OF LIFE

8. THE FOUR WORLDS

9. HOD & NETZAH

 10. LIFE IS EVERYWHERE

11. LIFE AND DEATH

12. REINCARNATION

13. PSYCHOLOGY

14. THE VITAL PRINCIPLE

15. SYNCHRONICITY

16. TZIM-TZUM

17. BODIES OF MAN

18. HUMAN MIND

19. LILITH

20. KNOWLEDGE

21. OF ANGELS AND MEN

22. CREATION IN  GENESIS 2

23. THE LETTER YOD

24. TWENTY-TWO LETTERS

25. THE NAME OF GOD

26. THE ZOHAR

27. ABRAHAM AND SARAH

28. THE HEBREW LANGUAGE

29. THE PATRIARCHS

30. MALKHUT - THE LAST SEPHIRA

31 THE MYSTICAL KABBALAH

32. BETH – THE FIRST LETTER










INTRODUCTION


1. WHAT IS KABBALAH?

2. OTHER PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE

3. PYTHAGORAS

4. THE TAROT

5. ADAM KADMON

6. ACT OF CREATION

7. THE TREE OF LIFE

8. THE FOUR WORLDS

9. HOD & NETZAH

 10. LIFE IS EVERYWHERE

11. LIFE AND DEATH

12. REINCARNATION

13. PSYCHOLOGY

14. THE VITAL PRINCIPLE

15. SYNCHRONICITY

16. TZIM-TZUM

17. BODIES OF MAN

18. HUMAN MIND

19. LILITH

20. KNOWLEDGE

21. OF ANGELS AND MEN

22. CREATION IN  GENESIS 2

23. THE LETTER YOD

24. TWENTY-TWO LETTERS

25. THE NAME OF GOD

26. THE ZOHAR

27. ABRAHAM AND SARAH

28. THE HEBREW LANGUAGE

29. THE PATRIARCHS

30. MALKHUT - THE LAST SEPHIRA

31 THE MYSTICAL KABBALAH

32. BETH – THE FIRST LETTER











INTRODUCTION


1. WHAT IS KABBALAH?

2. OTHER PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE

3. PYTHAGORAS

4. THE TAROT

5. ADAM KADMON

6. ACT OF CREATION

7. THE TREE OF LIFE

8. THE FOUR WORLDS

9. HOD & NETZAH

 10. LIFE IS EVERYWHERE

11. LIFE AND DEATH

12. REINCARNATION

13. PSYCHOLOGY

14. THE VITAL PRINCIPLE

15. SYNCHRONICITY

16. TZIM-TZUM

17. BODIES OF MAN

18. HUMAN MIND

19. LILITH

20. KNOWLEDGE

21. OF ANGELS AND MEN

22. CREATION IN  GENESIS 2

23. THE LETTER YOD

24. TWENTY-TWO LETTERS

25. THE NAME OF GOD

26. THE ZOHAR

27. ABRAHAM AND SARAH

28. THE HEBREW LANGUAGE

29. THE PATRIARCHS

30. MALKHUT - THE LAST SEPHIRA

31 THE MYSTICAL KABBALAH

32. BETH – THE FIRST LETTER


Meetings With Remarkable People   Mephisto & Pheles    Intrusion   The Kabbalah  
 The Čapek Brothers    Struggle of the Magicians    
The Fools' Pilgrimage  Contact 




13. PSYCHOLOGY

 

 

SYNCHRONICITY

Synchronicity is a term coined by Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961, left) the Swiss psychologist. Jung spoke of synchronicity as being an “acausal connecting principle,” meaning that it is a pattern of connection that is not explained by causality. Even simpler, it is a meaningful coincidence. Jung felt that it was the principle that surrounded his concept of the collective unconscious. He also believed that many experiences perceived as coincidence were due not merely to chance, but instead they potentially reflected the manifestation of coincident events.

If you are on the path, be on a lookout for synchronistic events that might come your way and would, sooner or later. In 1990 I travelled with my wife and our five year old son to Czechoslovakia (as it was then — now the Czech Republic), the country where I grew up and which I left more than twenty years earlier. One of the places we went to visit in the first few days of our six week long stay was Pecka, a medieval castle in the north of the country, not far away from my wife’s birthplace, where we were staying with her parents. The castle’s most significant owner was Christopher Harant of Polžice and Bezdružice (1564-1621, right), one of the 27 rebellious Czech aristocrats who were publicly beheaded at the Prague main square in 1621, after their defeat by the Catholic armies at the White Mountain. After this, the country fell for three centuries into the hands of the Hapsburg dynasty. Harant was an extremely well educated man, who has made his name even as a composer of late Renaissance music.  His Missa Quinis Vocibus, a mass for five voices, and a couple of other compositions, have survived to this day and are still occasionally performed.

Christopher Harant was also an initiate, and during the 1590s he was in service of the Emperor Rudolf II, famous for bringing the cream of European alchemists and esotericists to his seat in Prague. Harant’s connection with the Rosicrucian movement in its very early stages (the Fama Fraternitatis of the Laudable Fraternity of the Rosy Cross came out in 1614) naturally cannot now be absolutely proven, but there is circumstantial evidence indicating that he was involved and probably very deeply so.  We can only say that he was the right man at the right place at the right time.

The Pecka castle is now partially in ruins, but well-preserved are still some of the buildings, and also the large undercroft. When we arrived we soon found out that a newly formed group of surrealist painters had arranged for an exhibition of their works to be displayed there. This was only a few months after the fall of the Communist regime. During the time of Communist regime, surrealism was not at all popular with the state authorities, and those who painted in this style were often persecuted. The past regime’s ideologists knew very well what they were doing. Surrealism by its very nature, from its beginning at about the time of the First World War, has always been the domain of people leaning towards alternative views of the world, towards esotericism, Hermetic sciences, Kabbalah, Alchemy, and similar subjects that encourage personal growth and independent ways of thinking, as against the uniformity preferred by any totalitarian regime. The young painters who exhibited at this temporary art gallery in the cellars of the castle (apparently it has since become a regular venue for other exhibitors) were no exception, as we were soon to find out, after meeting several of them. The reputation of the former owner of the castle made them choose this venue, and as this was the last day of the exhibition most of the members of the group had gathered there to pick up their works. Had we come a day later or a day sooner, we would not have met any of them. Coming even on the same day but at slightly different time, we might have never even found out about the exhibition. A different guide might not have told us. Everything had to fit in tightly. One of the artists mentioned to me that he had a contact to someone belonging to a group in Prague, which was very seriously studying the above subjects, and has under the previous regime even been clandestinely publishing books. I pricked my ears, asked him for details, and he said that he could put me in touch with this person. He did, and a few days later I met him (currently he is the president of the Czech Astrological Society and an author of several books) in a Prague café, and later other members of this remarkable group.

During the discussion we had together I found out that in the span of about two decades during the time of the former regime, the group had published dozens of so the called samizdats — which originally was a Russian word for clandestine publications produced by the dissidents, and which has now become internationally accepted. In the beginning they were simply turning out carbon copies of the original typewritten manuscript. That’s a hard job, as I found out while helping to produce some, before I left the country in 1969 – one can usually make only five or six copies at the time, with the last two being barely readable. I was shown some of their more recent samizdats, and they included translations of books I knew well, with one of them even written by a French author of more than twenty books on the Kabbalah, with whom only a few years prior to this I had toured the northern parts of Australia. During the last two or three years of Communism in the late 80s, when the regime’s vigilance had somewhat slackened, these dissidents were getting progressively more audacious, and in the last years of the totalitarian regime they had even managed to produce small editions (usually several hundred copies) of some titles in form of properly finished paperbacks, most of them boldly printed at night time on the presses of government owned publishing houses, where some of them held their daytime jobs, all this right under the noses of the totalitarians. There were books on the Kabbalah, Alchemy, and Hermetic sciences generally, some recently written, others reprints and reproductions of texts up to several hundred years old, all published in the city of Prague, which in the sixteenth and seventeenth century was the hub of esoteric studies and activities for the whole of Europe. As soon as it became possible they revived a Hermetic order that was active in the 1920s and 30s and which has been thriving ever since. These people’s contribution towards a major revival of the Hermetic and Kabbalistic tradition in the country, particularly during the early nineties, was very significant, and having remained in contact with them afterwards I was also able to add to it in a small way.

Another synchronistic event took place a couple of weeks later. We were all in Zbraslav, a medieval town with a famous monastery, where my father was born and where my grandfather was once the church organist and choirmaster. It has now become a suburb of Prague. We walked, not for the first time, past the house where I had lived as a child. I had stopped for a few seconds, only to show my son a particular place where I used to play when I was about his age. At the same time, a man of approximately my age walked up the road and around the corner, just in time to see me pointing to the spot in the garden, and asked me if there was something interesting to see. I explained what it was about; he smiled and invited us inside. It turned out that he was the present owner. Not only that. In the ensuing conversation, in the room that was familiar yet looked and felt so different, it came out that he was a writer of esoteric books, with a particular fixation on homœopathy, the subject that I found most intriguing, since a homœopath had shortly before that cured my wife of an illness that had the conventional medical scientists completely baffled. We also found out that we grew up only a couple of street corners apart, and that we both went to the same primary school, but all this at the other end of Prague than where we were sitting now. For the two of us to meet in this way there was only a window lasting perhaps a maximum of ten seconds, during which our meeting has had to take place. An extra second or two either way and we would have either walked past each other, or not seen each other at all. As it is, nearly twenty years later we are still in a regular contact, and I have even translated one of his books on homœopathy.

 

FREUDIAN AND JUNGIAN PSYCHOLOGY

When people like Jung speak or write about synchronicity, it is done in a scholarly manner, using terms like acausal connecting principle, etc. Jung did this because throughout his life he had to struggle for his theories to be recognised in the smaller scientific circles. I use the word “smaller,” because he had no chance whatsoever to be recognised on the really wide scale and, of course, he knew that. By its very nature, psychology always will be a subject that will draw a great deal of criticism from the orthodox scientists of any persuasion. When Sigmund Freud (1856-1939, right), appeared on the scene, a generation before Jung, he was able to convince the scientific audience with a relative ease that his ideas had merits, and thus he was accepted as a serious scientific researcher in the then relatively new field of psychology. Jung never had such luck. At best he was accepted as Freud’s pupil, a hallmark that had stayed with him practically until his death. Nevertheless, his discipleship to Freud, if at all he ever felt that way, had only lasted a few short years. The differences in the thinking ways of these two giants of modern psychology were far too wide to allow the teacher-student relationship to continue. Freud was essentially a materialist, whose theories about our libido forming the main driving force for development of our personality had fitted nicely into the general climate of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Jung on the other hand believed in, or certainly was prepared to at least take seriously, a large number of phenomena, which were held by Freud and his colleagues to be mere superstitions, such as alchemy, astrology, clairvoyance, prophecy, spiritualism, telepathy, telekinesis, extra sensory perception, even UFOs.

Today, there is a whole new breed of Jungian oriented psychologists who have become the leading force in the field. Whereas their Freudian colleagues would typically tend to see most of the psychological problems people might have in the light of suppressed libido or similar, the Jungians would be more likely to speak of loss of creativity, loss of religious conviction. The Jungian orientated psychologists believe that to be rescued from their aimless, empty inner lives, people need to have access to the archetypes, which are to be found in the realm of collective unconscious.

 

PSYCHOLOGY AND SCIENCE

The scientific way of thinking, even quite a long way into the 20th century, was still perceived as being more or less rigidly materialistic. Then the new physics arrived and with it the likes of Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, Max Born, and others, who took it to a completely different level, where it rapidly began to lose its earth-like solidity. To us particularly interesting is Wolfgang Pauli (1900-1958, left), because of his association with Carl Jung. When the two met, Pauli had his greatest success — the Exclusion Principle, which he formulated in 1925 and for which he was to receive the Nobel Prize in 1945, already behind him.

Pauli, who as it appears had some psychological problems following the break-up of his marriage, in 1930 consulted Jung, with whom he seemingly had only one thing in common — they both lived near the same city of Zurich in Switzerland. Twenty-two years after this, The Interpretation of Nature and the Psyche, the book that they wrote together, was published. In the meantime, Jung had analysed about four hundred dreams that Pauli had and described to him, some in person but mostly in letters, which they kept exchanging even when Pauli lived in America during the war, and which were later also published as Atom and Archetype: The Pauli & Jung Letters.

To the reader conditioned by the 20th century preoccupation with the “pure science,” the juxtaposition of the views of a physicist and a psychologist must appear somewhat bizarre. Physics particularly, up till relatively recent times, were almost a model of empirical science, with the lines clearly drawn in the sand, crossing of which was a daring act indeed, for any recognised scientist who would thus be risking wrath of his colleagues. This process of gradual solidification went hand in hand with the more materialistic ways of thinking and the related technological progress. But if we are to look for the sources of the new ways of thinking, we have to go back more than three centuries, to the so-called Age of the Enlightenment, to people who were around the creation of The Royal Society of London for the Improvement of Natural Knowledge in 1660, and to those who in the several previous generations have laid the necessary foundations. Here, of course, we’ve seemingly run into a paradox. While it is impossible to deny the Royal Society’s significance in development of science and scientific ways of thinking that were to eventually prevail completely by the 19th century, we also have to realise that those who stood by its cradle certainly were no materialists. People like Robert Flood, Samuel Hartlib, Francis Bacon, Elias Ashmole, Jan Amos Comenius, even the celebrated Isaac Newton (1643-1727, left), around whom an aura has steadily been built of a prototype of scientific genius, were far from being materialistic in their basic make-up. The untouchable founder of modern science and the mechanistic universe, the quintessential symbol of the human intellect, Sir Isaac Newton, as has more recently been emerging out of the shadows zealously cast by his successors was, above all, a practising alchemist and an apocalypticist in his philosophical and religious orientation. Naturally, this had not fitted the image that was artificially created of Newton by those who would like to see him as the stereotype of materialistically oriented scientist. The publishing in 1687 of his The Philosophić Naturalis Principia Mathematica, in our days often hailed as the most important scientific work ever written, didn’t change Newton much at all.  Together with John Locke, and Robert Boyle, who incidentally was eventually to ban alchemy from the agenda of the Royal Society, Newton continued to study alchemy (or chymistry, as it was known in his days) in a serious manner. Newton, Boyle and Locke apparently had sworn one another to secrecy in the spirit of true students of esotericism.  In 
letter written to Boyle, for instance, Newton urges him to keep “high silence” in publicly discussing the principles of alchemy. He wrote: 

“Because the way by the Mercurial principle may be impregnated has been thought fit to be concealed by others that have know it, and therefore may possibly be an inlet to something more noble that is not to be communicated without immense damage to the world if there be any verity in the warning of the Hermetic writers. There are other things besides the transmutation of metals which none but they understand.”

Newton, who has in modern times been given the label of the supreme rationalist, rejected the notion of Descartes’ clockwork universe, because for him it lacked spiritual dimension. He had spent days locked up in his laboratory, and some have even suggested that he eventually may have succeeded in transmuting lead into gold. In any case, over a period of 25 years he had kept meticulous records of his alchemical experiments (some of which were only very recently discovered), which begin in about 1660 and continue to 1695. Many of Newton’s writings on alchemy, which at the time of his death were thought unfit to publish, are now housed at the Jewish National and University Library in Jerusalem.

 

 

William Blake: Isaac Newton (detail - c.1795)
 

It appears that the science of physics at least has now come around a full circle, and is once again concerning itself with the human mind, as it was in Newton’s time. Pauli, who became a student of Jung’s, was certainly trying to use the knowledge he thus gained of the depths of analytical psychology and the human unconscious mind, to pursue his studies of the nature and composition of the material universe. Equally, Jung must have gained an extra insight while working from the opposite direction, into the mind of a mind conditioned to solving problems connected with the quantum physics.

 

14. THE VITAL PRINCIPLE


Meetings With Remarkable People   Mephisto & Pheles    Intrusion   The Kabbalah  
 The Čapek Brothers    Struggle of the Magicians    
The Fools' Pilgrimage  Contact 



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