Voyen Koreis





INTRODUCTION


1. WHAT IS KABBALAH?

2. OTHER PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE

3. PYTHAGORAS

4. THE TAROT

5. ADAM KADMON

6. ACT OF CREATION

7. THE TREE OF LIFE

8. THE FOUR WORLDS

9. HOD & NETZAH

 10. LIFE IS EVERYWHERE

11. LIFE AND DEATH

12. REINCARNATION

13. PSYCHOLOGY

14. THE VITAL PRINCIPLE

15. SYNCHRONICITY

16. TZIM-TZUM

17. BODIES OF MAN

18. HUMAN MIND

19. LILITH

20. KNOWLEDGE

21. OF ANGELS AND MEN

22. CREATION IN  GENESIS 2

23. THE LETTER YOD

24. TWENTY-TWO LETTERS

25. THE NAME OF GOD

26. THE ZOHAR

27. ABRAHAM AND SARAH

28. THE HEBREW LANGUAGE

29. THE PATRIARCHS

30. MALKHUT - THE LAST SEPHIRA

31 THE MYSTICAL KABBALAH

32. BETH – THE FIRST LETTER










INTRODUCTION


1. WHAT IS KABBALAH?

2. OTHER PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE

3. PYTHAGORAS

4. THE TAROT

5. ADAM KADMON

6. ACT OF CREATION

7. THE TREE OF LIFE

8. THE FOUR WORLDS

9. HOD & NETZAH

 10. LIFE IS EVERYWHERE

11. LIFE AND DEATH

12. REINCARNATION

13. PSYCHOLOGY

14. THE VITAL PRINCIPLE

15. SYNCHRONICITY

16. TZIM-TZUM

17. BODIES OF MAN

18. HUMAN MIND

19. LILITH

20. KNOWLEDGE

21. OF ANGELS AND MEN

22. CREATION IN  GENESIS 2

23. THE LETTER YOD

24. TWENTY-TWO LETTERS

25. THE NAME OF GOD

26. THE ZOHAR

27. ABRAHAM AND SARAH

28. THE HEBREW LANGUAGE

29. THE PATRIARCHS

30. MALKHUT - THE LAST SEPHIRA

31 THE MYSTICAL KABBALAH

32. BETH – THE FIRST LETTER











INTRODUCTION


1. WHAT IS KABBALAH?

2. OTHER PATHS TO KNOWLEDGE

3. PYTHAGORAS

4. THE TAROT

5. ADAM KADMON

6. ACT OF CREATION

7. THE TREE OF LIFE

8. THE FOUR WORLDS

9. HOD & NETZAH

 10. LIFE IS EVERYWHERE

11. LIFE AND DEATH

12. REINCARNATION

13. PSYCHOLOGY

14. THE VITAL PRINCIPLE

15. SYNCHRONICITY

16. TZIM-TZUM

17. BODIES OF MAN

18. HUMAN MIND

19. LILITH

20. KNOWLEDGE

21. OF ANGELS AND MEN

22. CREATION IN  GENESIS 2

23. THE LETTER YOD

24. TWENTY-TWO LETTERS

25. THE NAME OF GOD

26. THE ZOHAR

27. ABRAHAM AND SARAH

28. THE HEBREW LANGUAGE

29. THE PATRIARCHS

30. MALKHUT - THE LAST SEPHIRA

31 THE MYSTICAL KABBALAH

32. BETH – THE FIRST LETTER


\

Meetings With Remarkable People   Mephisto & Pheles   Intrusion   The Kabbalah  
 The Čapek Brothers    Struggle of the Magicians    
The Fools' Pilgrimage  Contact 



17. THE BODIES OF MAN



The Hebrew word Guf (also Guph, sometimes Gup) means corporal vehicle. It is the physical body, which without a soul to occupy it is dead, meaning that guf is really a corpse. It is the body, as we see it when we look into mirror, it is a mass of flesh, bones, muscles, nerves, brain matter, blood, and skin, and to many people it is an object of utmost care, because it has become their idol, because they fully identify themselves with it and with nothing else. To the scientists it is solid and it amounts to 65% Oxygen, 18% Carbon, 10% Hydrogen, 3% Nitrogen, 1.5% Calcium, 1% Phosphorus, 0.25% Potassium and Sulfur, 0.15% Sodium and Chlorine, and about 50 other chemical elements, ending with Radium, of which we have 0.00000000000000001% in our bodies.  To the wise, however, Guf it is the most transient, impermanent, and illusionary of the whole series of bodies that constitute the entire man. Guf is a body that has lost (or never gained) every part of its spirituality, so that there is nothing that would animate it.

To become alive, Guf needs to gain the vital principle that animates the body, which is called Nefesh. Nefesh is also the lowest level of spirit. In English Nefesh is usually translated as soul, but this could easily be misleading. Much closer to this concept is the Etheric Body of the Theosophists, also called the subtle body or the life-force body, which sustains the life of the physical body, and serves as the pattern or matrix for the metabolic functions of the physical body or Guf.
The bible says that God created man out of clay of the earth and he breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, Neshamah. At this instance we may imagine that God is like a glass blower who is sending his breath through a tube (man’s nostrils). Neshamah that pours in spreads itself at the outer surface of the glass, near the skin. It thus remains close to the surface of our bodies, to our senses.  As this process takes place, for Neshamah to spread itself and reach the outer levels of the skin of the body there is a need of a force. This force is Ruah, which acts as an intermediary between Nefesh and Neshamah. The meaning of the word Ruah is wind; a wind like energy is needed to force Neshamah into this position.  Our soul, according to the Kabbalists, therefore consists of Nefesh, Ruah and Neshamah. There are higher levels of spirituality, the next one being Hayah, and the highest of them all being called Yehida, or oneness.

We can immediately see that the Kabbalistic doctrine goes much farther than do the popular Judaism or Christianity, so far as the higher principles of man are concerned. So do the secret doctrines of the eastern religious/philosophical systems, such as Buddhism or Hinduism, which were combined and offered to the Westerners in the teachings of Theosophy. William Q. Judge 1851-1896, left), one of the original founders of the Theosophical Society writes in his book The Ocean of Theosophy (published 1893):

The Christian teaching, supported by St. Paul, since upon him, in fact, dogmatic Christianity rests, is that man is composed of body, soul, and spirit. This is the threefold constitution of man, believed by the theologians but kept in the background because its examination might result in the readoption of views once orthodox but now heretical. For when we thus place soul between spirit and body, we come very close to the necessity for looking into the question of the soul’s responsibility - since mere body can have no responsibility. And in order to make the soul responsible for the acts performed, we must assume that it has powers and functions. From this it is easy to take the position that the soul may be rational or irrational, as the Greeks sometimes thought, and then there is but a step to further Theosophical propositions. This threefold scheme of the nature of man contains, in fact, the Theosophical teaching of his sevenfold constitution, because the four other divisions missing from the category can be found in the powers and functions of body and soul, as I shall attempt to show later on. This conviction that man is a septenary and not merely a duad, was held long ago and very plainly taught to every one with accompanying demonstrations, but like other philosophical tenets it disappeared from sight, because gradually withdrawn at the time when in the east of Europe morals were degenerating and before materialism had gained full sway in company with skepticism, its twin. Upon its withdrawal the present dogma of body, soul, spirit, was left to Christendom.

The seven principles or, if you wish, the seven bodies of man, according to the Theosophists, can be seen in the table below (on right are their Sanskrit and their Kabbalistic equivalents):

1.    The Body - Rupa - Guf
2.    Vitality  - Prana-Jiva - Ruah
3.    Astral Body - Linga-Sharira - Nefesh
4.    Animal Soul  -  Kama-Rupa - Nefesh
5.    Human Soul  -  Manas  -  Neshamah
6.    Spiritual Soul  -  Buddhi  -  Hayah
7.    Spirit  -  Atma  -  Yehida

We are making this foray into other religious/philosophical systems to provide those who might have some grounding in Theosophy or its close relative the Anthroposophy, with a wider picture of what we are dealing with. If we make a comparison of the Theosophical system with the Kabbalah, the first level, Rupa obviously is identical with Guf, while Ruah corresponds to Prana-Jiva, or Vitality. Nefesh however is not quite so straight forward, because it appears to combine the two levels of Linga-Sharira and Kama-Rupa. The next level, that of Neshamah, would then have be more or less identical with the Theosophical Manas or the higher mental body.
Dion Fortune in her Mystical Qabalah has this to say on how the Kabbalistic and Theosophical systems correlate:
 
These Sephiroth unquestionably have their correlations in the chakras of the Hindu system, but the correspondences are given differently by different authorities. As the method of classification is different, the West using a fourfold system and the East a sevenfold system, correlation is not easy to obtain, and in my opinion it is better to look for first principles rather than obtain a tidy pattern of arrangement, which does violence to the correspondences.

The only two writers known to me who have attempted this correlation are Crowley and General J. F. C. Fuller. General Fuller assigns the Muladhara Lotus to Malkhut, pointing out that its four petals correspond with the four elements. It is interesting to note that in the Queen scale of colour, as given by Crowley, the Sphere of Malkhut is represented as divided into four quarters, coloured respectively citrine, olive, russet, and black, to represent the four elements, and bearing the closest resemblance to the usual representations of the Four-petalled Lotus.

This Lotus is represented as situated in the perineum and is associated with the anus and the function of excretion. In column XXI of the table of correspondences given by Crowley in, he attributes the buttocks and anus of the Perfected Man to Malkhut. I consider that from every point of view the attribution of Fuller, who refers the Muladhara Lotus to Malkhut, is to be preferred to that of Crowley, who in column CXVIII refers it to Yesod, thus contradicting himself. In the infantile mind, according to Freud, the functions of reproduction and excretion are confused, but I don't consider that this attribution is one that can be generally accepted or ought to be perpetuated.

Malkhut, viewed as the Muladhara Lotus, represents, we may take it, the end-result of the life processes, their final concretion in form, and their submission to the disintegrating influences of death in order that their substance may be utilised again. The form into which they have been organised by the slow processes of evolution has served its purpose, and the force must be set free; this is the spiritual significance of the processes of excretion, putrefaction, and decomposition,

The Svadisthana Chakra, the Six-petalled Lotus, at the base of the generative organs, is assigned by General Fuller to Yesod. This agrees with the Western tradition, which assigns Yesod to the reproductive organs of the Divine Man; its astrological correspondence with the Moon, Diana-Hecate, also agrees with this attribution. Crowley, though assigning Yesod to the phallus in column XXI of “777,” assigns the Svadisthana Lotus to Hod, Mercury. It is difficult to understand this attribution, and as he does not give his authority, I consider it better to adhere to the principle of referring the levels of consciousness to the Central Pillar.

Tiferet, by universal consent, represents the solar plexus and breast; it therefore seems reasonable to attribute to it the Manipura and Anahata Chakras, as Crowley does. Fuller attributes these chakras to Geburah and Chesed, but as these two Sephiroth find their equilibrium in Tiferet, this attribution presents no difficulty and causes no discrepancy.

In the same way the Visuddhu Chakra, which in the Hindu system correlates with the larynx and is referred to Binah by Crowley, and the Ajna Chakra at the root of the nose, which correlates with the pineal gland and is referred to Chokmah by the same authority, may be taken as uniting for function in Daat, situated at the base of the skull.

The Sahasrara Chakra, the Thousand-petalled Lotus, situated above the head, is referred by Crowley to Kether, and there can be little reason to quarrel with this attribution, for it is foreshadowed in the very name of the First Path, Kether, the Crown, which rests upon and above the head.

    Naturally, we must bear in mind that the two systems have developed more or less independently of each other, each through the “agency” of a language — the other language being Sanskrit, which is the liturgical language of both Buddhism and Hinduism and in its classical form the language of the Vedas. Sanskrit is almost certainly the oldest member of the Indo-European family of languages. The initiates hold Sanskrit as the only other sacred language, alongside the Hebrew language.



Frantisek Kupka: The Beginning of Life




Meetings With Remarkable People   Mephisto & Pheles   Intrusion   The Kabbalah  
 The Čapek Brothers    Struggle of the Magicians    
The Fools' Pilgrimage  Contact 

hts reserved